Volume 3 Issue 2

Case Report: Incidental Finding in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit after a Post-Anesthetic Seizure

Jill Irby, Tolga Suvar* and Carolyn Mehaffey

Objective: This case demonstrates an incidental finding after a patient suffers a seizure in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU)
Case report: A 46-year-old African American male was scheduled for a right hip arthroplasty due to an osteoarthritic hip following a motor vehicle accident in 2007. This patient had no previous surgical history and no significant medical history. Moments after transfer to the PACU the patient flailed his arms above his head for a brief duration estimated to have lasted less than 15 seconds. The movements subsided without the requirement of anti-seizure medications.
Conclusion: The Computed Tomography scan (CT) demonstrated a large frontal mass (Figure 1). The patient started levetiracetam and was subsequently discharged home without sequalae the patient will be scheduled for surgery in the next upcoming months for removal of the meningioma.

Cite this Article: Irby J, Suvar T, Mehaffey C. Incidental Finding in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit after a Post-Anesthetic Seizure. Am J Anesth Clin Res. 2017;3(2): 037-039.

Published: 30 November 2017

Case Report: Regional Anesthetic Technique for a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and an Unusual Appearance of the Lower Extremity Nerves

Tolga Suvar*, Mark Stevens, Gregory Mehaffey, Arjav Shah and Mikhaela Arambulo

Objective: This case demonstrates challenges associated with regional anesthesia and demonstrates safe anesthetic techniques for a surgical procedure in an NF1 patient.
Case Report: A 27-year-old patient with neurofibromatosis 1 had developed a rapidly growing mass in his right foot that required biopsy. History of multiple cranio-cervical-thoracic fusions, scoliosis, and limited neck extension raised concerns for a difficult airway.
Conclusion: In place of the popliteal and saphenous nerve blocks, the surgical procedure was successfully managed with an ankle block using low volume 0.5% bupivacaine as we targeted the right superficial, deep, and tibial nerves, with a subsequent field block performed around the saphenous nerve.

Cite this Article: Suvar T, Stevens M, Mehaffey G, Shah A, Arambulo M. Regional Anesthetic Technique for a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and an Unusual Appearance of the Lower Extremity Nerves. Am J Anesth Clin Res. 2017;3(2): 034-036.

Published: 15 November 2017

Case Report: Refractory Postoperative Hypoxaemia Secondary to Pulmonary Leukostasis Syndrome. Can we think about this?

Ana Belen Fernandez* and Marina Sanchez

The incidence of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia is about 4 new cases/100,000 habitants per year, and only 10%-20% of patients present with hyperleukocytosis. 30%-40% of hyperleucocytic patients develop clinical signs of brain or pulmonary leukostasis, resulting from the obstruction of capillary vessels by leukaemic cells. Early recognition of leukostasis syndrome is of great importance since leucapheresis may improve short-term outcome. Our case is an AML debut that presents with hypoxemia and progressive respiratory failure, in early postsurgical period of corpo-caudal pancreatectomy, demonstrating the need to have this diagnosis in our minds to start treatment as soon as possible.

Cite this Article: Fernandez AB, Sanchez M. Refractory Postoperative Hypoxaemia Secondary to Pulmonary Leukostasis Syndrome. Can we think about this? Am J Anesth Clin Res. 2017;3(2): 031-033.

Published: 21 October 2017

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